A Case for Scum’s Wish

If you follow me on Twitter, you probably notice that the majority of my tweets regarding this season’s anime are about either Maid Dragon or Demi-chan. Those two shows are absolutely delightful, and both have brought tears to my eyes on multiple occasions, which is no easy feat. However, the shining star of this anime season, for me, is easily Scum’s Wish. Of course, if you know anything about the plot of Scum’s Wish, you surely know that the characters do just about everything except shine.

There are a lot of ways to describe exactly what Scum’s Wish is, from ‘Toradora, but problematic,’ to ‘a harem deconstruction, minus the harem, minus the deconstruction.’ I think the latter description, which was the one I’ve used myself, offers some interesting insight. I always look at music, anime, political events, art, etcetera in the greater context of the history surrounding them. When I first read the Scum’s Wish manga, which was the first manga I’d ever read, the first and most distinct connection I made was, of course, to School Days. This is one reason I believe that School Day’s is a must watch for all anime fans. Like Evangelion, FLCL, The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, Angel Beats, Monogatari, Puella Magi Madoka Magica, and Sword Art Online, School Days, whether you like it or not, is a title that is frequently mentioned in reviews of many anime that have been released since.

Scum’s Wish reminded me of School Days, but as I thought more about what School Days was, a harem deconstruction, I quickly realized that Scum’s Wish was not a harem, and since it was not a harem, it could not possibly be a harem deconstruction. Scum’s Wish is the anime equivalent to the first member of a new species. It has inherited quite a bit from its predecessors, but it is too different from them to be considered the same species. This is a good thing for anime. This genre was born among the early visual novels, most prominently, White Album, which eventually received a fantastic anime adaptation in 2009. There were many other visual novels from that time that revolved around infidelity, and the first of these to receive a widely viewed anime adaptation was School Days. This tradition of infidelity-centric visual novels is most interesting because these stories typically end in a huge clusterfuck. I can’t really give any examples without giving spoilers, but if you’ve seen any of these shows, you’ve got a pretty good idea what I’m talking about. Unfortunately, Visual Novel adaptations, especially eroge adaptations, are, for the most part, not very good. Part of this comes from the problems that come with adapting multiple routes, but for the most part its because of their questionable final causes.

We’re only five episodes into Scum’s Wish, and it is already a huge clusterfuck. Scum’s Wish is a deeply psychological show as well. The characters are constantly striving to understand the reasons why they interact with each other the way they do, and we know that because we’ve spent some time in each of the protagonists’ minds. They’ve all gotten, or will get, some time serving as the narrator. This show feels very real. I suppose what I’m trying to say here is that Scum’s Wish is a special show, and if you aren’t watching it already, you should consider picking it up.

4 thoughts on “A Case for Scum’s Wish

  1. I don’t know why, but I laughed really hard at this:

    > Scum’s Wish was not a harem, and since it was not a harem, it could not possibly be a harem deconstruction.

    Uhhh…. don’t ask me why. Like I said, I don’t know. Also, this makes absolutely zero sense to me:

    > a harem deconstruction, minus the harem, minus the deconstruction

    What is that supposed to mean?

    Anyway, I’m not sure this blog post as a whole will convince anyone who hasn’t already watched it to do so. You didn’t really explain what Scum’s Wish is, but explain what it isn’t, so people who haven’t watched similar shows wouldn’t know what it is. However, people who liked similar shows probably don’t really need convincing. Also, I don’t really care that much about the history of harem deconstruction.

    Definitely better than what I can write, though.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. By the way, I don’t know of many people who would say that Sword Art Online is a must watch for all anime fans. And you’re the first person I know who puts it on equal footing with Madoka, Evangelion, etc.

      Like

    2. Yeah, this post assumes familiarity with shows like School Days. “a harem deconstruction, minus the harem, minus the deconstruction” is supposed to make no sense. I wrote this in the middle of the night because I hadn’t posted in like three weeks and it made sense to me

      Like

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